The Latest:

Business of Art: Taxing Artists

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

You’re an artist, so you don’t have to worry about some of the constraints that come with running a business. Or do you? Unfortunately, concentrating solely on the process of creating your art is not always possible.

Photo credit: BlackEnterprise

David Sharp: Artists And Finance

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

In this column, NYFA Program Officer Edith Meeks interviews performing artists about issues relating to their working careers. Here, she speaks with David Sharp about artists and finance.

Edith Meeks: You’ve made a pretty unusual career combination of dancing and corporate financial consulting. Do you make any connection between the two?

Art Consultants: The Hidden Resource

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

What are art consultants, or, as they are sometimes known, art reps or private art dealers? They are essentially people who sell art but who do not have a gallery.

Accounting FAQ

Compiled by Andrea Mills and Steve Barry, Grant Thornton Philadelphia, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

1. Do I need an accountant?

If you are able to do your bookkeeping and file your tax returns yourself, then you probably do not need an accountant. Once your business becomes more complicated or more time-consuming, then it is probably advisable to hire an accountant and a bookkeeper. It is also advisable to hire a qualified professional such as an accountant or an attorney during the initial setup of your organization. Both professionals will be able to clarify questions and help with the choice of the most appropriate business entity.

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